uboot5161:

Carl Larsson : Suzanne, 1894.

uboot5161:

Carl Larsson : Suzanne, 1894.

erikkwakkel:

Circular song
Medieval music books, with their merry notes jumping off the page, are a pleasure to look at. This sensational page from the 14th century adds to this experience in a most unusual manner. It presents a well-known song, the French ballade titled En la maison Dedalus (In the house of Dedalus), be it that the scribe decided to write both music and lyrics in a circular form. There is reason behind this madness. The maze created by music and words locks up the main character of the song, the mythological figure Ariadne, who is a prisoner in the house of Daedalus - she is represented by the red dot. The book contains treatises on music theory, notation, tuning and chant. In other words, it was meant for experts readers. The beholder likely enjoyed the challenge of singing a circular song (did he or she spin the book around?) and how it held its subject hostage in the merriest of ways.
Pic: Berkeley, Music Library, MS 744 (made in Paris in 1375). More about the manuscript here, including more unusual images. This is a study of the book (the ballade is discussed at p. 14).

erikkwakkel:

Circular song

Medieval music books, with their merry notes jumping off the page, are a pleasure to look at. This sensational page from the 14th century adds to this experience in a most unusual manner. It presents a well-known song, the French ballade titled En la maison Dedalus (In the house of Dedalus), be it that the scribe decided to write both music and lyrics in a circular form. There is reason behind this madness. The maze created by music and words locks up the main character of the song, the mythological figure Ariadne, who is a prisoner in the house of Daedalus - she is represented by the red dot. The book contains treatises on music theory, notation, tuning and chant. In other words, it was meant for experts readers. The beholder likely enjoyed the challenge of singing a circular song (did he or she spin the book around?) and how it held its subject hostage in the merriest of ways.

Pic: Berkeley, Music Library, MS 744 (made in Paris in 1375). More about the manuscript here, including more unusual images. This is a study of the book (the ballade is discussed at p. 14).

(via tea77green)

blastedheath:

Sven Jonson (Swedish, 1902-1981), Blå skymning [Blue dusk], 1954. Oil on canvas, 24 x 33 cm.

blastedheath:

Sven Jonson (Swedish, 1902-1981), Blå skymning [Blue dusk], 1954. Oil on canvas, 24 x 33 cm.

likeafieldmouse:

Inigo Aragon - Contemporary Altars (2012)

(via heureexquise)

"Now, to pry into roots, to finger slime,
To stare, big-eyed Narcissus, into some spring
Is beneath all adult dignity. I rhyme
To see myself, to set the darkness echoing."

— Seamus Heaney would have been 75 years old this month. We’re remembering him by looking at the language of his first full-length collection, Death of a Naturalist. (via oupacademic)

(via warmthcalled)

mpdrolet:

Christy Turlington, 1989
Herb Ritts

mpdrolet:

Christy Turlington, 1989

Herb Ritts

(via milkwoods)

martinvlach:

untitled on Flickr.

martinvlach:

untitled on Flickr.

"Stories are compasses and architecture; we navigate by them, we build our sanctuaries and our prisons out of them, and to be without a story is to be lost in the vastness of a world that spreads in all directions like arctic tundra or sea ice. To love someone is to put yourself in their place, we say, which is to put yourself in their story, or to figure out how to tell their story. Which means that a place is a story, and stories are geography, and empathy is first of all an act of imagination, a storyteller’s art, and then a way of traveling from here to there."

— Rebecca Solnit, The Faraway Nearby (via doskapozora)

(via bluewoodensea)

theredshoes:

Louis Lozowick, New York, 1925. Lithograph

theredshoes:

Louis Lozowick, New York, 1925. Lithograph

(via backtothefiveanddime)

les-sources-du-nil:

Ladislav-Emil Berka (1907-1993)

les-sources-du-nil:

Ladislav-Emil Berka (1907-1993)

(via holdthisphoto)